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 THE GARDEN

Dream | Plant | Nurture | Harvest

My home garden has evolved over time into the inspiring and beautiful outdoor space I have today.  Sculpted perennial beds and lush climbing vines anchor my cutting garden and rows of summer annuals add splashes of vivid color and a lavish abundance to the landscape.  In the corner of our property a small hoop house shelters heat loving herbs and edibles.  All of the flowers used to create my seasonal arrangements and designs are grown in these spaces surrounding my home.  Each flower is nurtured from seed to vase and has been selected and grown for its appealing color, texture, scent or movement in floral design. 

Consisting of just 520 square feet of formal growing space with additional perennials beds in my landscaping garden, I produce a wide variety of specialty cut flowers from mid-May to mid-September, including:

SHOW STOPPERS:

Peonies, Icelandic Poppies, Tulips, Daffodils, Dahlias, Ranunculus, Anemones, Asters, Rudbeckia, and Sunflowers.

COTTAGE GARDEN FAVORITES:

Cosmos, Snapdragons, Stocks, and Phlox.

UNIQUE FOLIAGE AND FILLERS:

Cress, Queens Anne's Lace, Hibiscus, and Bells of Ireland.

GRASSES AND GRAINS:

Millet, Amaranth, Feathertop Grass and Frosted Explosion Grass.

FRAGRANT HERBS AND EDIBLES:

Bachelors Buttons, Basil, Mint, Lavender, Rosemary.

FRUITS AND FLOWERING PERENNIALS:

Gooseberry, Raspberry, Hydrangeas, Goat's Beard, Woodland Anemones.

VINES:

Clematis, Love in a Puff

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Garden planning starts during the winter months when I complete my vision for the upcoming year, order seeds, and begin preparing for the summer months ahead.  Spring flowering tulips and daffodils are planted in late fall with many other varieties of summer blooming flowers being started indoors in late January.  Flowers are tended to in my seeding room under lights until the weather warms in April, when the seedlings are slowly transitioned outdoors.  Once the ground is workable in spring, direct seeded summer flowering annuals are sown into the garden and seedlings are transplanted into prepared beds after the last spring frost in May. 

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All of the flowers produced at Scissors Creek are grown in the field, not under cover.  Growing with efficiency in mind, I am continually aiming to maximize what I can produce out of my small growing space, each year offering a few treasured varieties from previous years along with many new and unique varieties.  I strive to produce a flower collection that is a true delight for the senses and an exploration of all that is possible in this short growing season.